1. 2016

        1. Date string
          01/12/2016
          Title
          Register now for the presentation of OASE 97 on 12 December 2016 in Antwerp!
          Educated text tagged
          Program presentation OASE 97 on 12 December 2016:
          - 19.30: walk in
          - 20.00: the program will start with a lecture by Willem Jan Neutelings, after which Xaveer De Geyter will give his reaction. On the basis of some projects Xaveer De Geyter and Willem Jan Neutelings will continue talking about action and reaction in architecture
          - 22.00: drinks

          Location:
          The “Blauwe Foyer” of deSingel, Desguinlei 25, Antwerp (Belgium)

          The program will be in Dutch.

          Please note that registration for this event is compulsory and can be done
          via this link to Evenbrite.
      • 2016

        • Date string
          07/11/2016
          Title
          Now available: OASE 97. Action and Reaction in architecture
          Educated text tagged
          Creating and thinking about architecture has always been defined by the mechanism of action and reaction. One way of making architecture is criticized or rejected and immediately used as a starting point for another, opposing and better method, practice or theory. Architects and critics react to each other’s views using drawings, texts, models and buildings. A good architecture culture thrives on such a basis: the exciting battle between views, opinions and beliefs.

          OASE 97 describes and illustrates passionate debates and polemical interactions from the seventeenth to the late twentieth century. The result is a collection of opposing yet inseparably connected definitions of good and necessary architecture.
          1. Action and Reaction in Architecture_VanGerrewey&Patteeuw.pdf121 KB
      • 2016

          1. Torres del Parque in Bogotá, architect: Rogelio Salmona
        • Date string
          27/10/2016
          Title
          Presentation of OASE 95 in Bogotá, Colombia by Klaske Havik
          Educated short text tagged

          On 28 October 2016 Klaske Havik - member of the editorial board of OASE - will be the closing speaker during the Semana del Arquitecto in Bogotá, Colombia. She will present OASE 95 and talk about transcultural practices in architecture and urbanism. The event is organised by the Sociedad Colombiana de Arquitectos Bogotá.

      • 2016

          1. Date string
            01/09/2016
            Title
            Exhibition about Karel Martens in New York
            Educated text tagged

            Press release by P!
            P! is thrilled to present the first North American solo exhibition of renowned Dutch graphic designer Karel Martens. Having played a crucial role within the gallery’s program, Martens now premieres a body of work—including his signature letterpress monoprints, an interactive video installation, a modular wall-covering system, and a kinetic clock sculpture—that extend his nearly 60 year experimentation with color, overprinting, patterning, and time.

            Martens’ work emerges from a set of seemingly disparate concerns. An interest in precision and process accompanies sheer aesthetic intuition and the beauty of chance; his focus on the permanence of printing exists side-by-side with a fascination for clocks and the ephemeral passing of moments. In all of this, Martens aspires to something that may seem unfashionable today: to create timeless, abstract works, expressions of his continuous exploration and formal invention.

            Building upon Martens’ early kinetic work of the 1960s, a new clock sculpture—composed of three multi-colored disks that rotate according to hours, minutes, and seconds—transforms the flow of time into a phenomena of form and color. In contrast, a grid of letterpress monoprints from the past year displays Martens’ intimate engagement with paper and ink. Overprinted with as many as ten layers on found administrative cards, these unique prints produce surprising and complex visual effects.

            Presented at P! in a wall-scale installation, Martens’ conceptual wallpaper system stems from his investigations into printing technology and permutational systems. Offset-printed A4 sheets featuring stripes of varying thickness, rendered in different colors, function as analog pixels in a do-it-yourself graphic kit. The show’s final work is an interactive video application that translates the camera’s vision into a custom pattern language. Viewers control the scale and density of the pattern, reflecting Martens’ interest in the open-ended and ongoing process of image-making.

            With thanks to: Jaap Aarts, Bahman Eslami, Aagje Martens, Diederik Martens, Levi Murphy, Jonathan Bruce Williams

            Karel Martens: Recent Work
            11 September – 30 October 2016
            Opening reception: Sunday, 11 September, 6–8pm

        • 2016

          • Date string
            01/06/2016
            Title
            Now available: OASE 96. Social Poetics - The Architecture of Use and Appropriation
            Educated text tagged
            OASE 96 examines the remarkable revival of architectural practices that focus on reuse and appropriation of buildings, environments and materials. To what extent can and will designers engage in this process, and what is the possible positive or negative social impact of these interventions? This issue focuses on case studies, practical experience, critical refl ection and ideas that show how architects and urban planners proactively deploy reuse in view of future user opportunities and/or applications.

            Between the faith in the autonomy of architecture on the one hand and design that centres on the user on the other lies a whole range of practices that address the traditional separation between design and use in a radical way. In this issue, the contrast between design and use is not perceived as an issue that needs to be resolved, but as a productive area of tension within which architecture is created.
        • 2016

            1. Date string
              29/05/2016
              Title
              Call for Papers OASE 98 | Narrating Urban Landscapes
              Educated text tagged

              This issue of OASE brings together an interest in the perception and design of urban landscapes with a particular methodological view. In urban planning and landscape practices developed in recent decades, notions such as ‘sense of place’ and site-specificity have been reintroduced as leading concepts, especially in redevelopment of ‘post-productive’ landscapes: former industrial areas, brownfields, harbours, mining sites, etcetera. Here, the landscape was transformed and manipulated rigorously in favour of industrial production processes, and often planned from a bird’s-eye perspective, according to tabula rasa methods or zoning plans projected directly from the drawing table onto the territory. In redesigning and making accessible such spaces, this abstracting perspective made way for an approach taking into account the experience on the terrain, rooting the identity of a site in a retracing of former uses. Therefore, in much of these reconversion projects (for example in Emscher Park), design approaches are called in that claim to ‘read’ the different layers and meanings of a site, understood as the locus of different stories, which can be revealed, reconstructed and altered. Today, a new type of redevelopment is high on the agenda: that of suburban areas around or between cities. Built mainly in the post-Second World War period, these urban landscapes are subject to far-reaching demographic changes and development pressure, especially because most city centres and the above-mentioned post-productive landscapes are becoming fully developed. However, suburban areas often seem to lack the site-specificity and the history of inner cities and brownfields. An important challenge is how to enhance the legibility of an urban landscape that has been planned in a seemingly chaotic way, from tabula rasa planning to a piecemeal infill, juxtaposing layers and – often contradictory – meanings? If suburbia is to become city, what is its ‘sense of place’? And what is the story that holds it together?

              This issue of OASE investigates narrative approaches of analysis and design of both post-productive and suburban landscapes. How are narrative means (textual as well as visual) used as a way to (re)construct stories of landscapes, to reveal site-specific identities, to investigate experiential qualities, to place the subject back in the centre of the analysis and design project? How does narrativity foster the experience of temporality and history in the experience of landscape? A fertile ground for such explorations, in which the ‘reading’ of the urban landscape became subject of urban investigation, can be found in the critical responses to the abstracting perspective of modern architecture and urban planning, for instance by the British Townscape movement, and in the interest in the subject’s experience of the urban landscape in the work of American designers and researchers such as Kevin Lynch, Lawrence Halprin, Edmund Bacon, Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown. In the course of the 1960s and 1970s, their field of interest shifted from the inner city to suburbia and highway landscapes, which were in full development at the time. They used a wide range of media that can be described as ‘narrative’: ‘serial views’, interviews, mental mapping and they experimented with the juxta- and superposition of photographic images, sketches, text and maps. However, this interest in experiential and narrative aspects of urban landscapes has its precedents in older site-specific and experience-oriented approaches (for example Camillo Sitte’s attempt to link the modern city to the specificity of the site and the pedestrian experience), as well as in landscape architecture (for example the picturesque garden, specifically designed from a routing as a narrative structure).

              This issue of OASE aims to explore the legacy of these historical approaches, and seeks appropriations of such methods to address today’s questions of urban landscapes. We are looking for two types of contributions. First, we invite contributions of/on (landscape) architects and urban planners using a narrative approach in analysis and design today. Which techniques are used, and how are they brought into practice? Second, we invite theoretical and/or historical reflections, taking the exploration of the experiential and narrative aspects of urban landscape in history as a starting point for a critical reflection. Who constructs the narrative, how and why? How does the narrative relate to power relations? Can narrativity provide a way of conceiving of subject-object, reader-writer as active relationships instead of as opposites?

              T
              he aim of this issue of OASE is to understand the historical foundations of the concept of narrativity in reading and designing the (urban) landscape, and to uncover the relevance of narrativity for today’s practice.

              Please send your abstract of max. 500 words before July 15, 2016 to info@oasejournal.nl
              Notification of results: 25 July 2016
              Papers: max. 3000 words
              Deadline: 15 September 2016
              Release of the issue: May 2017

          • 2016

            • Date string
              18/01/2016
              Title
              Now available: OASE 95. Crossing Boundaries. Transcultural Practices in Architecture and Urbanism
              Educated short text tagged

              This issue of OASE takes as its point of departure the cross-cultural conditions in which architects, urban designers and landscape architects work. It focuses in particular on architects working in a condition of displacement – in other words in relation to cultures, far away or nearby, that are not their own.

          • 2015

              1. Date string
                12/11/2015
                Title
                Audio recording presentation OASE 94 online on YouTube
                Educated short text tagged
                The audio recording of the presentation of OASE 94 with Rem Koolhaas in De Kunsthal on 3 September 2015 is now available online on our YouTube channel: https://youtu.be/OMUWyFEI9p8
            • 2015

              • Date string
                17/08/2015
                Title
                Presentation of OASE 94 with Rem Koolhaas on Thursday 3 September 2015 in The Kunsthal
                Educated text tagged
                On Thursday 3 September 2015 OASE 94, devoted to the early work of OMA/Rem Koolhaas, will be presented at the auditorium of the Kunsthal in Rotterdam.

                The editors of this issue, Christophe Van Gerrewey and Véronique Patteeuw, will have a conversation with Rem Koolhaas on the first decade of the Office for Metropolitan Architecture, 1972-1989.

                Doors open at 19:00, program starts at 19:30. Admission 10 or 27,50 euro (including a copy of OASE 94).
                Please reserve your tickets by e-mail: info@nai010.com.



            • 2015

                1. Date string
                  12/08/2015
                  Title
                  OASE 94: Parc de la Villette competition 1982 - CORRECTION
                  Educated text tagged
                  Mr. Bernard Tschumi has informed the editors of OASE of a misattribution in the text of George Baird, published in OASE 94 (OMA The First Decade), on the competition for Parc de la Villette in 1982. Mr. Tschumi did not participate in the competition together with Alexandre Chemetoff. There was no joint Tschumi/Chemetoff submission. The landscape design of the 125-acre Parc de la Villette was entirely Bernard Tschumi’s responsibility (Mr. Chemetoff was simply invited by Tschumi to design a small 2-acre sunken bamboo garden). Only the Tschumi scheme won a majority of the votes in the 21-person jury.
                  Following the announcement by Mr. Tschumi, Mr. Baird has asked to make public the following statement: “I thank Bernard Tschumi for correcting the credits for his winning entry to the Parc de la Villette competition, and apologize to him - and to the readers of OASE - for this misattribution.” In the digital version of OASE 94, to be published next year, the credits will be corrected.
                  The editoral team of OASE apologizes for this misunderstanding, to all parties involved and to the readers of the journal.


              • 2015

                  1. Date string
                    09/07/2015
                    Title
                    Call for papers OASE 96 | SOCIAL POETICS _ The Architecture of Use and Appropriation
                    Educated text tagged
                    SOCIAL POETICS _ The Architecture of Use and Appropriation

                    Els Vervloesem, Marleen Goethals, Hüsnü Yegenoglu, Michiel Dehaene

                    This issue of OASE is situated within a tradition that gives a central role to questions of use and appropriation in architectural reflection. The general attention to use and appropriation is part and parcel of a layered critique of architecture. The critique of a vulgar take on functionalism in favour of an open interpretation of the relationship between form and use (Rossi). The critique of commodification by placing the focus on use value rather than exchange value (Lefebvre). The critique of the hegemony of design (and the designer) in favour of design practices centred around use and usership (Jacobs, Gehl).

                    This issue of OASE will focus on the marked revival of forms of architecture that explicitly address questions of use and appropriation in the development of a sociocritical architecture. How can designers incorporate experience and use into their design process and architecture projects? Is this self-obvious or a point of contention? To what extent are designers ready to engage in processes of use and appropriation?

                    Between the belief in the autonomy of architecture on the one hand, and heteronomic, user-centred forms of design on the other, lies a broad spectrum of practices that radically question the traditional separation between design and use. In this issue, the opposition of design and use, of autonomy and heteronomy, is not addressed as a matter to be resolved, but rather as a productive force field for architectural production, as a dialectic to be spatially articulated and from which architecture and the city may derive meaning. In short, OASE #96 wishes to explore architectural projects that put great stock in the poetics of use and appropriation in the production of architectural meaning.

                    Call for Papers

                    We invite contributions of maximum 1500 words discussing critical architectural or urbanist design practices that mobilise use and appropriation as poetic material. These practices will be combined to produce both case-specific insights and shared ideas and arguments. In this way, we hope to move beyond the polemical theoretical discussions that have dominated this subject in the past. We ask authors to explicitly address the position adopted by themselves or other designers in the creation and articulation of possibilities of use. The papers must present a specific project or design practice that sheds light on the conceptual framework, the underlying motivations and the specific context in which this practice was developed.

                    The central question in this issue of OASE is how design can proactively engage with future users and possibilities of use. This involves much more than the legitimation of design choices and is not limited to discussions on user participation or user-centred design. We are, for example, interested in the various ways in which possibilities of use are conditioned by changes in the public or private character of a space, its accessibility, its visibility, etcetera. We are equally interested in projects that carve out conditions outside of the public-private dichotomy and create new collective worlds, new commons, counter spaces of the urban regularity. We would like to include practices that move beyond the classical role play of client, architect, user, and situate design in a broader ecology of actors and users. We are looking for practices that display a keen awareness of the possible positive or negative impact of architectural or urban intervention and incorporate that reflection in the design. Strategies that work for the protection of the city as use value against the effects of land speculation, for instance, belong in this category. We are looking projects that conceive of use as a learning process and explore together with users the changing meaning of architecture. There is room for places concerned with reuse, reappropriation and the recycling of building elements and materials. We are interested in projects that work with traces of use (cf. usure), that conceive of use as patina rather than wear and tear. In the relationship between architecture and furnishing, and between furniture and its use we may also find clues for an architecture of appropriation. We look for contributions discussing questions of multiple use and appropriation, of different temporalities of use, time windows and rhythms, temporary and permanent.

                    Deadline for full papers: 20 August 2015

                    Papers may be written in English or in Dutch.
                    You may contact the editors to discuss possible contributions.
                    The selection of papers will be made in function of the quality of the papers and the diversity of practices.

                    evervloesem@architectureworkroom.eu
                    Michiel.Dehaene@ugent.be


                • 2015

                  • Date string
                    15/05/2015
                    Title
                    Translucent oppositions. OMA’s proposal for the 1980 Venice Architecture Biennale. Léa-Catherine Szacka in conversation with Rem Koolhaas and Stefano de Martino
                    Educated text tagged

                    Léa-Catherine Szacka [LCS]: In 1980, OMA was invited to be one of the 20 exhibitors in the Strada Novissima at the Venice Biennale, entitled The Presence of the Past. Last year, in the catalogue of the 14th Biennale, you referred to that exhibition, saying that it felt like the end of architecture ‘as we know it’, and pointing out to the beginning of the Reagan era in 1981 and to the advent of neoliberalism. The Strada Novissima was a marketplace, the perfect performative space of consumption. How did you perceive this pivotal ‘postmodern’ moment?

                    Rem Koolhaas [RK]: I think the year 1980 marked the introduction of postmodernism at an enormous scale in Europe. I have always thought that postmodernism was the style par excellence of market economy. There was a strange discrepancy: probably the thinkers involved in the exhibition had the impression that they were working on a highly intellectual enterprise, with a lot of historical sophistication and dimension. But actually, I, at the time, perceived the exhibition as the first manifestation of the free market. The Strada Novissima showed what architecture, ruled by the market economy, would imply.

                    figure 1: Strada Novissima, Venice Architecture Bienniale 1980 (© Paolo Portoghesi).

                    LCS: It was not the inception of postmodernism, it was merely its diffusion to a larger public.

                    RK: It was the Europeanization of postmodernism. I lived in New York in the 1970s, so I was there when American postmodernism was born and when the arguments for it were being developed. I had an intimate overview of all the authors and how they interacted. I was alert to what postmodernism implied and I was horrified when I realized that it had reached Europe. That is probably why I tried to show a strong opposition to it. Taking part in the 1980 Venice Architecture Biennale was the occasion to make my opposition manifest.

                    LCS: As stated in the catalogue you were asked to design a facade: ‘your dwelling or a personal museum, a space for the exhibition and “sale” of your own ideas’. In other words: a billboard or a self-portrait. You went for a very simple design: a semi-translucent canvas, exposing the Arsenale. Lifted in the bottom left corner, the fabric was pierced by a red pole holding a neon sign saying OMA (or AMO). Your facade was not a copy of a facade from another project. It was a project in itself. How did it come about?

                    RK: Stefano made the drawings. We always had difficulties designing facades so this project was confronting us with our incompetence in a way. We had to do a kind of anti-facade or a non-facade.

                    Stefano de Martino [SdM]: The piece of canvas was a temporary screen – the only concession to an exterior presence was the OMA neon sign. We did not play the formalist game, proving that architecture can be very little, that you can concentrate on content.

                    figure 2: Strada Novissima, OMA/Rem Koolhaas, drawing by Stefano de Martino (© OMA).

                    LCS: Rem, in 2011 you said, in an interview with Charles Jencks in Architectural Design: ‘we were uncomfortable with the notion of the street’.

                    RK: I hated the idea of having to do a facade, even more a facade to represent oneself. So there were essentially a number of things that we wanted to avoid.

                    SdM: Yes, and the Biennale confirmed that we were on the right track. To know that we were in a minority was exhilarating. We upset a lot of people. Everyone else fell into a camp: the morphologists who couldn’t help considering cities as pieces of cheese that you cut up in blocks, and those who could only think of the ‘wow factor’ of their inventions… We were trying to see what was essential, before you need bricks. When you have a system of relations, then you have architecture.

                    LCS: Your facade, like all the others, was built by the set designers of Cinecittà. In what way did this imposed collaboration between architecture and cinema change the outcome? Could we speak of a fictional element in the facade?

                    RK: Our facade was fundamentally different. It was not even made by the Cinecittà technicians. But I think that the role of Cinecittà in the exhibition was tremendously interesting in the sense that it represented an early announcement of how unsubstantial architecture had become. Delirious New York was also about that: showing that architecture was no longer a substance but an illusion.

                    SdM: We were never into facadism. Maybe now that it’s all about facades, you don’t hear this word anymore, but at the time it was an insult. We saw the Strada Novissima as a kind of postmodern Potemkin village. Knowing the people invited, we could very well imagine what would happen. We knew it would be a horrendous pastiche. Our project moved in another direction: it was ephemeral, non-referential, and it produced its own logic, defining a situation instead.

                    LCS: Behind the facade you presented two projects concerned with preservation: one dealing with a medieval fortress, the extension of the Dutch parliament in The Hague (1978); and the renovation of the panopticon prison in Arnhem (1980). These projects resonated with the gesture of the wall: they were about opening the wall, creating a breach. How and why were these projects shown?

                    RK: We didn’t have a lot of work, and these were the two things that we were working on. By coincidence they both addressed the conversion of historical compound. The approach did not fit with the exhibition mentality. It was a convenient demonstration of how history could be approached in a different way. It was only when I started working on Cronocaos that I realized how consistently that has been a theme of our work. To some extent, I am a child of that mentality, but it took a different expression.

                    SdM: Next to the large charcoal, the watercolour drawings and the tiny models in plexi cases was Rem’s text ‘Our New Sobriety’, with the assertion that ‘the plan is of primary importance’. I remember quite some people were puzzled: ‘What is he saying? Ma che…?!’. But that was the real message. Rem wrote the text in ten minutes flat, in London. This manifesto was published in the catalogue for OMA’s first retrospective at the AA, in 1981.

                    RK: The text, together with our non-facade, was a way of asserting difference.

                    figure 3: Strada Novissima, OMA/Rem Koolhaas (© Charles Jencks).

                    LCS: You elaborated the project for the Strada Novissima parallel to the study for Boompjes Rotterdam (1980) and for housing projects in Berlin: Kochstrasse/Friedrichstrasse (1980) and Lützowstrasse (for IBA 1984).

                    RK: For Boompjes we were invited after the Biennale. It was the moment of separation between Elia Zenghelis and myself. The Dutch parliament project was still a collaboration, while the prison one was already just us. The separation was never about issues, it was just that it became difficult to work on the emergence of an architecture office, as a team. I don’t think that the Biennale influenced these projects, nor the other way around, but it could be that the Biennale made Boompjes possible, that it helped us to get the commission. A lot of things were coming together: in 1978 I published Delirious New York, then we almost won the competition for the Dutch parliament, and then there was the Biennale.

                    SdM: The Koch/Friedrichstrasse project was an alternative to the idea of the city current at the time – the street, making facades, rebuilding blocks… It took as a model the courtyard house, which has a boundary but no facade, and a void at its core, the inversion of a block. Next to the Berlin Wall, on a site with little substance left, this seems almost contextual…

                    LCS: What about the relation between the Strada and later OMA-projects?

                    SdM: The polemic was more relevant than the project itself. With the proposals for the Exposition Universelle in Paris, right after the competition for Parc de la Villette in 1982, we elaborated an immaterial, ephemeral architecture to get away from representation, especially in relation to the national pavilions. Architecture as national representation becomes very exhibitionist: it’s all about facades. In our proposal, the plan organises the activities on the two sites, focusing on the systemic aspects of the program, creating conditions for specific interpretations. It was abstract, but we had no trouble – and a lot of fun – to translate that into scenarios through collages.

                    LCS: The project for the Strada Novissima is not mentioned in official chronologies: not in S,M,L,XL, neither on the OMA website. Do you consider it as an architectural project or more as a discursive endeavour, a text, transformed into ephemeral architecture?

                    RK: I think that project was important because it was the first time we were recognized as part of an official group. It is an oversight rather than a deliberate repression. It has to do with the fact that, at the time, the office was a fiction. Stefano de Martino and I were working at my home. It was like a pre-office.

                    figure 4: Strada Novissima, OMA/Rem Koolhaas (© Charles Jencks).

                    LCS: If we do read your facade as postmodern, should we consider it as a sign (Venturi), a historic fragment (Rossi), or a communication device (Jencks)?

                    RK: Of course, we wanted to appeal to the street. We made the neon sign to find a blatant and perhaps American way of appealing – a sort of Venturian sign. The funny thing was that Venturi, at the time, was very much criticized, even in America. In New York the scene was dominated by Peter Eisenman and Robert Stern, and the two of them agreed that Venturi should be ‘out’.

                    LCS: Out of what?

                    RK: Out of everything he could be kept out of: out of books, out of architecture, out of history… They were united in hatred and contempt for Venturi. I was close to Eisenman, but I was also close to Venturi. I have always told Eisenman that one of the weaknesses of his intellectual position was his polemical blindness. Nevertheless, part of my reading of the 1980 Biennale was that Stern won.

                    LCS: The exhibition was hijacked and became perceived as historicist?

                    RK: Whether it was historicist or not, I don’t really care, but Stern won simply as an influence. And with that it became a commercial proposition, representing the kind of postmodernism that became the style of choice for developers. That was very visible and I think Europeans were so naive that they couldn’t see that.

                    LCS: Portoghesi, when embarking on the daunting task of organizing the Biennale, asked Charles Jencks but also Robert Stern, Christian Norberg-Schulz, Vincent Scully and Kenneth Frampton to be part of the organization committee – Frampton soon quit because he didn’t agree with the curatorial and theoretical positions. Who do you think was responsible for your presence?

                    RK: I think it was Jencks. I didn’t know Portoghesi. At the Biennale I shook his hand, but barely talked to him. Now, in retrospect, I think he is a very interesting architect. But with Jencks and Frampton, I was in an extremely unstable situation. I was a friend of Jencks since 1968, when I met him at the AA. Of course, I totally disagreed with Jencks’ positions and I still do, but we remained good friends. A little later, in the 1970s, I became friends with Frampton. In the 1970s, I agreed with his position. When I was writing Delirious New York he became more and more negative about my work. He thought it was terrible to write about Dalí. At the beginning of the 1970s Frampton had a good sense of me; at the end of the decade, he had a bad one.

                    figure 5: Strada Novissima, Venice Architecture Biennale 1980 (© Paolo Portoghesi).

                    LCS: Another ‘official group’ came eight years later, when you took part in the Deconstructivist Architecture exhibition at MoMA.

                    RK: In the Strada Novissima the majority of people was supporting and endorsing the message of the exhibition. They thought they could assert a particular thing. But no one wanted to be a Deconstructivist. In this way, 1980 was the last time a kind of coherence emerged between architects; in 1988, this had become impossible.

                    LCS: The Strada Novissima was the end of an agreement between architects?

                    RK: Exactly. If anyone was responsible for the Deconstructivist exhibition, it was Johnson. He really felt the need to reassert his power and to declare an agenda. He was convinced of being the true curator of the 20th century.

                    LCS: If Johnson’s move was political, so could have been Portoghesi’s. He was very close to Bettino Craxi who was head of the PSI in 1980 and Prime Minister from 1983 to 1987. Did you sense a political agenda in 1980? Was the exhibition linked to the political climate, to the tension of the anni di piombo?

                    RK: I missed that completely, partly because I had been living in America until 1979. It’s only in the last twenty years that I got a better understanding of Italian politics. Maybe it was asserting the possibility of a more cheerful Italy, but that would not have occurred to me at the time.

                    LCS: What happened after? It is difficult to assess or measure the ‘impact’ of an exhibition but it’s interesting to question the leap from the street of papier maché to the postmodern architecture of the 1980s. Some see the IBA, the Internationale Bauaustellung in Berlin, as a transposition of the Strada in the city.

                    RK: There is definitely a connection. It’s difficult: at a certain moment something is in the air…

                    SdM: The IBA owed a lot to the Strada. In 1979, it had been taken over by Josef Paul Kleihues and Vittorio Lampugnani, who propounded the idea of critical reconstruction to fill up a city that was losing inhabitants in droves. They operated with the idea of completing streets where there were no streets left, something like Woody Allen cloning the Leader from his nose in SleeperAnd of course the cadavre exquis that typified the Strada Novissima showed that you could produce diversity within a strict scheme.

                    LCS: Was it important to be part of that vibe at the beginning of the eighties?

                     RK: I love being part of a group, but when the moment is there I find it terribly uncomfortable. I probably experienced a mixture of anxiety and fun.

                    LCS: You said at one point you were not so different from the others in the Strada Novissima.

                    RK: No, I wasn’t that much different. That is the whole point of Delirious New York: exaggerate the differences. You have no idea how controversial the idea was at the time to work on New York. Everyone thought it was a serious mistake and an irrelevant subject. And that is why I was always interested in Venturi and Scott Brown. Because I realized that they were extremely SMaRt and creative in the way they looked at things. I wanted to be part of that.

                    LCS: So, in retrospect, you were postmodern?

                    RK: I don’t know. I think everyone is. One exhibition I was happy to be part of was Les Immatériaux at the Centre Pompidou in 1985. I really felt at home, much more than at the Biennale, and much more than in the Deconstructivist Architecture exhibition. In Les Immatériaux, I showed the Boompjes project – it is, by the way, very similar to the Rotterdam building we recently (and finally) realized. I felt close to that exhibition because it was not connected to an architectural movement: it proposed a kind of thinking through a condition. I have always felt closer to Lyotard and Latour or to other French intellectuals than to any one in America or England. It was exhilarating! It was Pompidou at its best and its most profound. It had nothing to do with matter or substance – it was concerned with thought.


                • 2015

                  • Date string
                    16/04/2015
                    Title
                    Now available: OASE 94. OMA. The First Decade
                    Educated text tagged
                    This thematic issue of OASE sheds new light on the architectural production of OMA during its first decade (1978-1989) – a mythical but at the same time not very well known period in the history of the world-famous office of Rem Koolhaas.
                    The proposals, plans and projects, both implemented and not, are subjected to critical appraisal and richly illustrated with fascinating, often unfamiliar visual material in this OASE. The projects include the residence of the Irish Prime Minister (1979), the design competition for Parc de la Villette in Paris (1982), Villa Palestra for the Milan Triennale (1986) and the designs for the City Hall in The Hague (1986) and the Swiss Hotel Furkablick (1988).

                • 2014

                • 2014

                  • Date string
                    11/11/2014
                    Title
                    Film screening at launch OASE #93
                    Educated text tagged
                    On November 20th OASE and the Architecture Film Festival, will screen “Robinson in Ruins” by Patrick Keiller in Floriscoop Rotterdam at the launch of the new OASE #93 magazine. The film will be introduced by the editors Michiel Dehaene and Claudia Faraone in English. Entrance is 5 euro. Seats are limited, please reserve a seat by filling in the form on the website of the AFFR.

                    Thursday November 20th 2014,
                    19.30 hrs Floriscoop, 
                    Graaf Florisstraat 88a
                    Rotterdam

                    Film synopsis:
                    Patrick Keiller’s latest sees his shadowy, somewhat eccentric titular researcher embark on another tour of ‘sites of scientific and historical interest’ in and around Oxford.
                    A decade after his earlier trips around London and England, film cans and writings are discovered suggesting that Robinson - though is that his real name - resumed his investigations upon release from prison. Keen to cure the world of ‘a great malady’ (symptoms include the banking crisis, global warming, war in Afghanistan and Iraq, and the transfer of British land to obscure owners), Robinson sought - or so we’re told by an ex-lover (Vanessa Redgrave) of the now deceased narrator of the first two films - to communicate with ‘non-human intelligences’ determined to preserve life on Earth… Keiller’s witty, revealing script weaves together philosophy, the arts, history, politics, economics, science, agriculture, architecture and much else, even as surreal, mysterious and beautiful images, imbued with a deep love of the natural world, remind us of what’s at risk. Timely indeed.
                • 2014

                  • Date string
                    02/05/2014
                    Title
                    Call for papers OASE 94 | O.M.A. – The First Decade
                    Educated text tagged

                    Theme Editors:


                    In 1989, from March 4th to April 16th, the first major retrospective exhibition in the Netherlands of the work of O.M.A./Rem Koolhaas, was organised in Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen in Rotterdam. Partly, O.M.A. – The First Decade was organized (and received) as a reckoning with Koolhaas’ home country: the office had lost many major competitions, for example in Den Haag or Rotterdam. Only a third of the 42 projects O.M.A. made between 1978 and 1989 got executed. At the opening night of the exhibition, Koolhaas said to a Dutch newspaper: ‘I believe that the Netherlands would have been a better country if at least a part of our plans were realised, and I say this rather stoically than rancorously.’

                    With this theme issue of OASE we would like to transcend national or polemical discussions, and look at the architectural production of O.M.A. during this first decade, leading to 1989 — a mythical but at the same time not very well-known period in the history of the office. We want to take a closer and critical look at the proposals, plans and projects themselves, for example in order to examine if — and why — they would indeed have contributed to a better spatial or social environment. Rather than focusing on — especially in the recent O.M.A.-research — important issues such as mediatisation, reception or discursive embeddedness, we want to contribute to this research by means of a fresh critical look on the architectural works.

                    In order to do so, we seek two different kinds of contributions. On the one hand, authors are invited to pick one O.M.A.-project out of the enclosed list of 42 items (produced between 1978 and 1989), and discuss it — short (maximum 1.5000 words) but insightful. What was at stake? What was the precise architectural move or decision? And how did the design fail or succeed? On the other hand, authors are invited to discuss one koolhaasian architectural technique from this period, in a more voluminous text (up to 2.000 words). What kind of formal regime was installed, and how did it deal with context? Was there a filiation visible with contemporary or historical architecture? And what where the ideas and convictions behind these architectural tactics?

                    We hope that this issue of OASE will shed new light on what was one of the most productive and provocative decades in the history of any modern architectural practice, exactly by showing how the architecture of O.M.A. ‘worked’ – spatially, formally and contextually.

                    The submission deadline for all manuscripts (in English or in Dutch) for this theme issue is August 15, 2014, 5 pm US Eastern Time Zone. Submission does not guarantee publication. Accepted articles will be published in issue 94 (April 2015). For author instructions please consult the submission guidelines.

                    Refer all inquiries to: christophe.vangerrewey@ugent.be
                    1. FIRSTDECADE.pdf35.6 KB
                      List of O.M.A. projects
                    2. OASE_guidelines for articles.pdf50.8 KB
                      Guidelines for articles
                    3. OASE_kopijaanwijzingen.pdf55.9 KB
                      Kopij-aanwijzingen
                • 2014

                  • Date string
                    29/04/2014
                    Title
                    Unique Presentation of OASE 91 in Amsterdam
                    Educated text tagged
                    A conversation about atmosphere in architecture.

                    Two world-renowned European architects, Peter Zumthor and Juhani Pallasmaa, have both identified atmosphere as a core theme of architecture. In architectural journal OASE 91 Building Atmosphere, Zumthor and Pallasmaa engage in a conversation about building atmosphere. This issue of OASE also includes an excerpt of the bookArchitektur und Atmosphäre by German philosopher Gernot Böhme, and his reflection on the notion of atmosphere in the work of Peter Zumthor andJuhani Pallasmaa. On April 29th OASE invites these three men to continue this conversation live on stage. 

                    Presentation

                    Date: Tuesday 29 April 2014
                    Time: 8 — 10 p.m.
                    Location: Pakhuis de Zwijger, Piet Heinkade 179, Amsterdam
                    Language: English
                    Admission: € 25,00

                    Ticket sales will start from Wednesday April 2nd 3 PM via www.dezwijger.nl/oase91. The number of places is limited. Maximum of two tickets per order.

                    Programme


                    OASE 91 Building Atmospheres

                    ‘What do we mean when we speak of architectural quality? It is a question that I have little difficulty in answering. Quality in architecture … is to me when a building manages to move me. What on earth is it that moves me? How can I get it into my own work? … How do people design things with such a beautiful, natural presence, things that move me every single time. One word for it is Atmosphere.’ — Peter Zumthor

                    OASE 91 Building Atmosphere also features a number of architectural projects, presented though a reading by literary writers, filmmakers and other professionals in whose disciplines atmosphere is a main concern. 

                    Editors: 

                    With contributions by:

                    Order a copy via www.nai010.com/oase91 (€ 19.95)
                • 2014

                  • Date string
                    10/03/2014
                    Title
                    Now available: OASE 92. Codes and Continuities
                    Educated text tagged
                    This issue of OASE magazine sheds light on a set of modernist architectural approaches that have languished in the shadow of their canonical counterparts. In this way, OASE offers points of departure for rethinking contemporary design attitudes. The so-called shadow canon epitomises an alternative set of design sensibilities and attitudes toward typology, tectonics and composition and advocates the presence of tradition as a means of rearticulating the modern. This double edition of Oase will have great relevance for a contemporary national and international discourse and practice characterised by a relentless search for more nuanced approaches to the built environment.
                • 2014

                    1. Date string
                      16/01/2014
                      Title
                      OASE 91 on the web
                      Educated text tagged
                      OASE 91 is being positively reviewed by James Taylor-Foster on ArchdailyArchidose (A Daily Dose of Architecture) reviews OASE 91 in it’s blog. The latest issue is also being referred to by drs. ir. Jan den Boer on Cobouw (dutch only). Archined dedicates an article on ‘Building Atmospheres’ and on the site of ‘de Architect’ OASE 91 is named one of Sander Woertmans favorite architectural books of 2013! (Both Dutch only.)
                  • 2013

                    • Date string
                      17/12/2013
                      Title
                      Now available: OASE 91. Building Atmosphere
                      Educated text tagged
                      Atmosphere is an essential concept for Swiss architect Peter Zumthor.  In his text Atmospheres (1996), Zumthor identified a series of themes that play a role in his work in achieving architectonic atmosphere. OASE exchanges ideas with Zumthor about the current relevance of this text, and about the practice of bringing together these elements in the design and construction process. Finnish architect Juhani Pallasmaa relates atmosphere in architecture to examples and theories from other disciplines like psychology and the visual arts. Zumthor and Pallasmaa also introduce the work of contemporary architects who in their view succeed in truly creating atmosphere through construction.

                      Peter Zumthor is winner of the 2009 Pritzker Prize and 2013 RIBA Royal Gold Medal. Zumthor has taught at Southern California Institute of Architecture in Los Angeles (1988), and the Harvard Graduate School of Design (1999) among others. 

                      Juhani Pallasmaa is Ruth & Norman Moore Visiting Professor at Washington University in St. Louis, Misouri as well as the current Plym Professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in Champaign, Illinois. Pallasmaa’s book The Eyes of the Skin – Architecture and the Senses has become a classic of architectural theory and is required reading on courses in many schools of architecture around the world.
                  • 2013

                    • Date string
                      17/12/2013
                      Title
                      Leeuwendalersweg 623–667, 3 Scenes
                      Educated text tagged
                      OASE asked filmmaker Nanouk Leopold and visual artist Daan Emmen to react on the collective space in a social housing block in the Kolenkitarea in Amsterdam by korth tielens architecten. Their contribution to issue #91 consists of a montage of 27 videostills and an online presentation.

                      The recordings are made in the stairways and entrance hall of the appartment-building, Leeuwendalersweg 623–667 in the Kolenkitarea in Amsterdam West.

                      Read more …
                  • 2013

                      1. Date string
                        02/08/2013
                        Title
                        OASE at CCA, Montreal
                        Educated text tagged

                        A discussion on architectural magazines and publishing with Pierre Chabard, co-founder of the biannual French magazine Criticat, and Véronique Patteeuw, editor of OASE.

                        Chabard will discuss Criticat’s production process as well as its editorial line-up and approach to architectural criticism. Patteeuw will present OASE within the field of architectural publishing and its latest issue addressing the question “what is good architecture?”.

                        Event information: 
                        8 August 2013, 6:00 pm 
                        CCA Bookstore
                        Free Admission

                        more information

                    • 2013

                        1. Date string
                          19/06/2013
                          Title
                          OASE 90 in Abitare 533
                          Educated text tagged
                          “Abitare” and the editors (Christophe Van Gerrewey, Véronique Patteeuw and Hans Teerds) of OASE 90 come together to examine and discuss possible answers to this question, considering the various points of view and stances taken in response to the simple, yet complex question: “What is Good Architecture?”
                      • 2013

                        • Date string
                          27/06/2013
                          Title
                          Presentation OASE 90. What is good architecture?
                          Educated text tagged

                          The recently published issue n°90 of the architectural journal OASE is entitled “What is good architecture?”. Bob Van Reeth and the curators of the Bob Van Reeth exhibition, Bart Verschaffel and Christophe Van Gerrewey contributed amongst others to this issue. On June 27, during the nocturne at BOZAR, the issue will be presented by OASE editor Véronique Patteeuw. Afterwards Bob Van Reeth will talk about his view on architectural quality, a view that will be challenged by other definitions of good architecture.

                          Date:
                          27th of June 2013, 7:30 pm

                          Place: 
                          at the entrance of the exhibition  Bob Van Reeth: Architect

                          Entrance: 
                          free — reservation via www.bozar.be

                          Language:
                          Dutch

                          Coproduction:
                          Bozar Architecture, A+Belgian Architectural Review

                      • 2013

                        • Date string
                          29/05/2013
                          Title
                          Now available: OASE 90. What Is Good Architecture?
                          Educated text tagged
                          Many problems in today’s architecture world would vanish if every once in a while it was clearer what is meant by good architecture. The ‘crisis of criticism’, for instance, is a symptom – seldom recognised as such – of the impossibility of knowing (or daring to know) what good architecture is. The assumption, critical in itself (and certainly useful), that each architecture project has to be judged anew each time has led everyone to unquestioningly assume that there is no values model for architecture. It has also ensured that the last models for evaluating architecture (modernism and postmodernism) are been followed merely by perversions (supermodernism, retromodernism, etcetera) or by ideals made into science (sustainability, mathematical models and regionalism).

                          Nevertheless, it is impossible to work with architecture – in design, theory or history – without making assumptions about criteria for quality. Just because a unique values model no longer exists does not mean that different values models cannot exist side by side. This issue of OASE uncovers and makes explicit the assumptions underlying these models, by posing the simple question ‘What is good architecture?’ in different ways and have it answered by people whose ‘main occupation’ is architecture. 

                          Of course the question of good architecture cannot be answered unequivocally and definitively. But simply because a question is certain to have an infinite number of answers does not mean it should not be asked. This issue of OASE can be like a banquet at which each guest selects something entirely different from the menu in a well-reasoned and forthright way – and so keeps the architecture party going.

                      • 2013

                          1. Edmond Sacré, Bagattenstraat, 1908
                        • Date string
                          25/04/2013
                          Title
                          Presentation: OASE 89. Medium
                          Educated text tagged

                          OASE 89 wil be presented on April 25 in the Stadsmuseum Gent (STAM).

                          Klaske Havik will present the issue.
                          Lada Hrsak will reveal the project ‘Scramble City’.
                          Michiel Dehaene will discuss the Mid-Size City in a conversation with Bart Verschaffel and Rudi Laermans.

                          stamgent.be

                      • 2013

                          1. Karel Martens, Monoprint on discarded system card
                        • Date string
                          01/04/2013
                          Title
                          Karel Martens in Paris
                          Educated text tagged

                          Le graphiste néerlandais Karel Martens occupe une place essentielle dans le paysage du graphisme, de l’art et du design d’aujourd’hui. L’un des praticiens les plus importants de sa discipline, Martens a développé depuis 1961 un travail à la fois appliqué et autonome, personnel et expérimental.

                          Ses contributions au graphisme incluent des timbres et des cartes téléphoniques, des revues et des livres, mais également de la signalétique et des interventions spécifiques dans des bâtiments. Sa pratique d’artiste, intimement liée à celle du graphiste, se développe autour d’une fascination pour la matérialité du papier, l’impression d’artefacts industriels et des constructions géométriques et “kinétiques”.

                          Parmi ses nombreuses distinctions: le prix H.N. Werkman (1993) pour la conception graphique de la revue OASE, le prix Dr A.H. Heineken de l’art (1996), la médaille d’or à la Foire du livre de Leipzig (1998) et la Gerrit Noordzijprijs (2012). Martens enseigne à la Yale School of Art, et a co-fondé l’école Werkplaats Typografie en 1997.

                          Karel Martens s’entretient avec Véronique Patteeuw, architecte de formation, enseignante à l’ENSAP Lille et éditrice de la revue OASE.

                      • 2013

                        • Date string
                          12/02/2013
                          Title
                          Now available: OASE 89. Medium. Images of the Mid-Size City
                          Educated text tagged

                          OASE 89 is dedicated to the image of the mid-size city. Not just the way this is interpreted, but also how it is produced by urban designers and architects. The urbanism discourse has long focused on phenomena such as the generic city. OASE 89, on the other hand, also devotes attention to the typically European condition characterized by its vast number of small and mid-size cities. In contrast with the (Asian) generic city, typified by its massive scale and loss of (historical) identity and public domain, there is the European mid-size city: a city with historical and geographical identity. This makes the model of this European generic city a resilient model, one with staying power in light of today’s urban challenges.

                      • 2012

                        • Date string
                          01/11/2012
                          Title
                          Now available: OASE 88. Exhibitions. Showing and Producing Architecture
                          Educated text tagged

                          OASE 88 examines the role of the architecture exhibition as a site of production. Bridging theory and practice, and relating historical examples to contemporary concerns, this issue considers the exhibition as a medium for experimentation, providing an alternative to the built project as a bearer of the practice of architecture.

                          Throughout modernity, exhibitions have played an essential part in the formation and differentiation of the culture of architecture. Apart from their historiographical role, they have been a means to identify commonalities in the present, stage discourse and instigate new forms of practice. But exhibitions are also built spatial manifestations in themselves and spaces in which unrealized proposals can be made public. As such, they offer various occasions for the elaboration of experimental design practices.

                      • 2012

                        • Date string
                          23/08/2012
                          Title
                          Now available: OASE 87. Alan Colquhoun
                          Educated text tagged

                          OASE 87 is dedicated to the thinking and the position of British architect Alan Colquhoun, situated within today’s debate on architecture criticism. The issue presents not only the different themes that Colquhoun has addressed in his work, but also the various positions that he has taken in his career: scholar, critic and practitioner.

                          Alan Colquhoun (b. 1921) has managed for decades to link his practical experiences with a particular way of thinking about architecture history and theory. Colquhoun has been making his mark since the 1950s, with constructive contributions to the discourse and the theorization of architecture. He has written important books like The Oxford History of Modern Architecture, and published essays in Architectural Criticism and Modernity and the Classical Tradition. Colquhoun’s work illustrates that architecture – even today – needs its own theory and cultural position.

                      • 2012

                          1. Date string
                            06/07/2012
                            Title
                            Public lecture by Owen Hatherley
                            Educated text tagged

                            Owen Hatherley is speaking within the programme of the Werkplaats Typographie End of the Year Show on Friday 6 July, in De Ateliers in Amsterdam.

                            Hatherley is a writer who lives in London. He writes on architecture, urbanism and popular culture and is one of the contributors to OASE’s upcoming issue OASE 87 ‘Alan Colquhoun’.

                            Public lecture:
                            Friday 6 July 17:00-18:00
                            followed by exhibition opening with drinks, 18:00-21:00

                            Location:
                            De Ateliers, Stadhouderskade 86, 1073 AT Amsterdam

                             

                        • 2012

                        • 2012

                            1. Date string
                              30/05/2012
                              Title
                              Now available: abstracts of OASE articles
                              Educated text tagged

                              In order to enhance OASE’s academic profile, the journal publishes from issue #81 onwards abstracts for all its articles. These abstracts permit an accurate insight into the contents of each contribution and allow scholars to explore OASE for research material. The contents of all abstracts is searchable through the website’s search engine.

                          • 2012

                              1. Pilgrimage church from Sint Jan van Nepomuk, Ždár - Giovanni Santini Aichel
                            • Date string
                              12/04/2012
                              Title
                              OASE 86 on Archined
                              Educated text tagged

                              The 86ste edition of the journal for architecture OASE is completely dedicated to baroque. On the relation between a small Czech pilgrimage church, the Berlin Philharmonic and a National parc Centre in the Swiss Zernez.

                              Read more at Archined

                          • 2012

                              1. Date string
                                06/03/2012
                                Title
                                New OASE editor
                                Educated text tagged

                                Christophe Van Gerrewey is scientific researcher (FWO) at the Department of Architecture and Urban Planning, Ghent University. He is preparing a PhD on post-war architecture criticism. He is the editor of Rooted in the Real. Writings on Architecture by Geert Bekaert (2011) and publishes on architecture and the arts. In 2012 appeared his first novel Op de hoogte, De Bezige Bij Antwerpen.  

                            • 2012

                            • 2011

                              • Date string
                                30/12/2011
                                Title
                                Now available: OASE 86. Baroque
                                Educated text tagged

                                In OASE 86, the architecture of the baroque is revisited and assessed with specific regards to its relevance for modern and contemporary architecture. On the basis of several historical studies, this issue examines how the complex geometric compositions, surface treatments and semantic operations of the baroque might be connected to contemporary design practice. To that end, the authors turn their attention to relatively underexposed practices, such as the Bohemian baroque of Santini Aichel and the work of Nicholas Hawksmoor, and examine the reception of the baroque by modern architects such as Hans Scharoun and Luigi Moretti. The way in which the baroque figures as a fertile medium for recent architectural practice in Europe is investigated in interviews with Hermann Czech and Christ & Gantenbein, and assessed in studies of the work of Robbrecht & Daem and Valerio Olgiati.

                                Editors of this issue: David de Bruijn, Maarten Delbeke, Job Floris, Christoph Grafe, Ruben Molendijk, Tom Vandeputte

                                With contributions by: Andrew Leach, Dirk De Meyer, Christian Kieckens, Luigi Moretti, Hans Scharoun, Martijn van Beek, Irina Davidovici

                            • 2011

                                1. Date string
                                  28/12/2011
                                  Title
                                  Call for Papers: OASE 89. Medium. Images of the Mid-Size City
                                  Educated text tagged

                                  Europe is a continent of small and medium sized cities. This could be a geographical statement, but is perhaps a more pertinent observation on the dominant collective imagination regarding the city. If the metropolis is the place of the modern urban experience, then the small and medium sized city is the context in which modernity is being absorbed and gains its familiar and honorable face. It is the natural habitat of a reformist type of urbanism and architecture that embrace modernity without choosing for the uncompromising idiom of modernism but chooses to package the new within a project that chooses for identity and legibility.

                                  Once the center of its own territory, the mid-size-city is more than ever the part and parcel of a horizontal network within which the opportunities and problems of the contemporary urban condition manifest themselves. The big assignments, demography, migration, mobility, ecology, are just as well the challenges of the large, mid-sized or small cities. From this perspective, the mid-size city has become today again the place in which the images and imaginaries surrounding the European city are being tuned and readjusted . This is both manifest not only in the return of traditional images and urbanisms that take the small town as the reference point for a narrative on sustainable development (e.g. transition towns), but also in the rediscovery of the mediating role of the mid-size-city and its capacity to generate new imaginaries (e.g. the project ‘Mid-Size-Utopia’, Zandbelt&vandenBerg). The mid-size-city, it turns out, is well equipped to accommodate the changing roles and positions within the networked landscape of cities. We are being witness to the reinvention of a historical cities’ network, in which no longer the central position of the different cities with respect to their hinterland is leading, but rather their respective interaction and relative position within an open network.

                                  For a new issue of the journal OASE dedicated to this theme we are in search of contributions on projects and design research specifically concerned with the Mid-Size-City as the place where the quite transformation of the European contingent takes on concrete spatial form and becomes the object of architectural and urbanistic intervention. Authors who approach the issue of the mid-size city from a perspective other than the project or design research are advised to respond to the Call For Papers of the Ghent Urban Studies Team for the colloquium ‘Mid-Size City. The dual nature of urban imagery in Europe during the long 20th century’ (Ghent, 19-21 April 2012). Authors can respond to both Call for Papers as well.

                                  Abstracts of max. 500 words are due before 31 January 2011, e-mail to bruno.notteboom@ugent.be

                                  OASE 89 will be released in the Fall of 2012; selected authors will be expected to deliver their full papers by the end of March 2012.

                              • 2011

                                  1. Date string
                                    20/11/2011
                                    Title
                                    Call for Papers: OASE 88. The Exhibition as a Site of Production
                                    Educated text tagged

                                    What possible relations can the exhibition assume in relation to architectural practice? How does its dual character, appearing both as a spatial situation in its own right and as a vehicle for making unrealised proposals known to a public, provide an opportunity to produce new discourses, experimentally stage architectural practice, or reconsider disciplinary limits? 

                                    OASE 88 examines the role of the architectural exhibition as site of production, rather than a strictly representative device. Bridging theory and practice, and relating historical examples to contemporary concerns, it considers the exhibition as a medium for architectural experimentation, providing an alternative to the built project as a bearer of architectural practice.

                                    OASE invites architects, historians and theorists to contribute to the upcoming issue. We specifically welcome case studies of historical exhibitions related to the above-mentioned questions.

                                    Abstracts of max. 500 words are due before 15 December 2011, e-mail to vpatteeuw@gmail.com and t.g.e.vandeputte@gmail.com

                                    OASE 88 will be released in the course of 2012; selected authors will be expected to deliver their full papers by spring 2012.

                                • 2011

                                    1. Photo: David Bennewith
                                  • Date string
                                    11/11/2011
                                    Title
                                    Documentary on OASE designer Karel Martens
                                    Educated text tagged

                                    The work of Karel Martens has taken an important place in the European art and design landscape. During his 50-year-long career, Martens has designed books and magazines, facades, signs and stamps. Since 1990, he is the designer of all OASE issues.

                                    Martens will be featured in television programme ‘De Canvasconnectie’, 13 november 2011, on CANVAS (BE) at 20.15.

                                    Trailer

                                • 2011

                                    1. Date string
                                      10/11/2011
                                      Title
                                      Symposium 'Models: On Imagination and Reality'
                                      Educated text tagged

                                      Following the publication of OASE 84 ‘Models’, editor Anne Holtrop organises in collaboration with KAdE a symposium on models on 17 November 2011 in the Kunsthal in Amersfoort.

                                      The evening programme:

                                      19:00 Doors open and possibility to visit the exhibition MärklinWorld.
                                      19:30 Start of the symposium.

                                      Introduction by Anne Holtrop (moderator for the evening). Speakers: Christophe Van Gerrewey (on the model as autonomous architectural work) and Krijn de Koning (on imagination).

                                      The symposium will be held in Dutch and will end at 22:00.

                                      See the website of Kunsthal KAdE for more information.

                                  • 2011

                                      1. Photo: Dorine van Meel
                                      2. Photo: Carlo Menon
                                    • Date string
                                      03/11/2011
                                      Title
                                      Panel discussion 'Constructing Criticism'
                                      Educated text tagged

                                      On Saturday 5 November, OASE editors Veronique Patteeuw and Tom Vandeputte will chair a discussion at the Architectural Association, London on new modes of criticism in recent publishing practices. Participants in the discussion will include Tina di Carlo (Log), Matteo Ghidoni (San Rocco), Benedikt Boucsein (Camenzind), Ian Pollard (matzine), Tiago Casanova (scopio) en Sebastian Craig (Touching on Architecture).

                                      The event takes place between 4pm and 5pm in the New Soft Room, Architectural Association, 36 Bedford Square, London WC1B 3ES.

                                      More information

                                  • 2011

                                      1. Photo: OASE
                                    • Date string
                                      30/10/2011
                                      Title
                                      OASE at the Architectural Association, London
                                      Educated text tagged

                                      OASE will take part in the exhibition ARCHIZINES at the Architectural Association School of Architecture, London. ARCHIZINES celebrates the recent resurgence of alternative architectural publishing with 60 new fanzines, magazines and journals from around the world. The exhibition, curated by Elias Redstone, is open to the public from 5 November to 14 December 2011. The private view takes place on Friday 4 November, followed by two chaired discussions in the Architectural Association on Saturday 5 November.

                                      AA Website

                                  • 2011

                                  • 2011

                                    • Date string
                                      28/09/2011
                                      Title
                                      OASE 81 Wins CICA Pierre Vago Journalism Award
                                      Educated text tagged

                                      The International Committee of Architectural Critics (CICA) has announced that the CICA Pierre Vago Journalism Award 2011 is awarded to OASE 81 ‘Constructing Criticism’.

                                      The complete list of winners was announced at the CICA Symposium held within the UIA World Congress Tokyo 2011 on September 28th in the Tokyo International Forum. The international jury consisted of: Joseph Rykwert (USA/UK), Manuel Cuadra (Germany), Sengül Gür (Turkey), Louise Noelle (Mexico) and Jennifer Taylor (Australia).

                                      List of winners (PDF)

                                  • 2011

                                      1. Date string
                                        14/07/2011
                                        Title
                                        OASE Reader’s Survey
                                        Educated text tagged

                                        OASE’s editor and publisher are very interested in the opinion and appreciation of it’s readers. That’s why we invite all our readers to participate in OASE’s Readers survey.

                                    • 2011

                                      • Date string
                                        06/07/2011
                                        Title
                                        Recently published: OASE 84
                                        Educated text tagged

                                        In OASE 84 the architectural model takes centre stage. Models are such a self-evident aspect of the architectural métier that barely any thought has been given to the specific contribution that these physical models make to the discipline. In an era when computer visualizations dominate architectural (re) presentation, the demise of the model seems to be looming on the horizon. While in architecture the role of the model remains underexposed and is even being called into question, in the visual arts the spatial capability of the model is currently being discovered. The models made by artists are revealing the power and quality of architectural models anew, and these special attributes are the subject of investigation in OASE 84.

                                        Launch of OASE issue 84 on Wednesday July 6th, 2011 at Gemeentemuseum Den Haag

                                    • 2011

                                      • Date string
                                        06/07/2011
                                        Title
                                        Presentation OASE 84
                                        Educated short text tagged

                                        Launch of issue OASE 84 on Wednesday July 6th, 2011 at Gemeentemuseum Den Haag with a lecture by Stefaan Vervoort on models in the artistic domain and by Christophe Van Gerrewey on models in the architectural realm.

                                    • 2011

                                      • Date string
                                        01/06/2011
                                        Title
                                        Exhibition on OASE’s Graphic Designer Karel Martens
                                        Educated text tagged

                                        This exhibition, held in Gallery The Narrows in Melbourne, focuses on Martens’ contribution to the graphic style of OASE. From 1990 (Issue 28) Martens took over the art direction of the journal, often working with students from the Werkplaats Typografie, an experimental typography school he founded in 1998 with Wigger Bierma. What began as a student magazine, evolved into an international professional journal in which a reflective and critical approach to architecture, urban design and landscape architecture is the mainstay. Recently celebrating its 75th issue, the success of OASE is, in part, due to Martens’ refined graphic statement, often absorbing his experiments in print and typography, while upholding the dialogue between graphic design and architecture. The exhibition features all 56 issues of OASE designed by Martens along with printed matter from his experimental studio practice. 

                                    1. 01/12/2016
                                      Register now for the presentation of OASE 97 on 12 December 2016 in Antwerp!

                                      On 12 December 2016 the editors of OASE 97 will talk about action and reaction in architecture with Xaveer De Geyter (XDGA) and Willem Jan Neutelings (Neutelings Riedijk Architects). Everyone is welcome!

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                                    2. 07/11/2016
                                      Now available: OASE 97. Action and Reaction in architecture

                                      OASE 97 presents a collection of confrontations between architects themselves, and between architects and architecture critics.

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                                    3. 27/10/2016
                                      Presentation of OASE 95 in Bogotá, Colombia by Klaske Havik

                                      On 28 October 2016 Klaske Havik - member of the editorial board of OASE - will be the closing speaker during the Semana del Arquitecto in Bogotá, Colombia. She will present OASE 95 and talk about transcultural practices in architecture and urbanism. The event is organised by the Sociedad Colombiana de Arquitectos Bogotá.

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                                    4. 01/09/2016
                                      Exhibition about Karel Martens in New York

                                      Exhibition “Recent Work” about OASE’s graphic designer Karel Martens presented at P!, a gallery in New York from 11 September - 30 October 2016. 

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                                    5. 01/06/2016
                                      Now available: OASE 96. Social Poetics - The Architecture of Use and Appropriation

                                      OASE 96 examines the remarkable revival of architectural practices that focus on reuse and appropriation of buildings, environments and materials. To what extent can and will designers engage in this process, and what is the possible positive or negative social impact of these interventions? This issue focuses on case studies, practical experience, critical refl ection and ideas that show how architects and urban planners proactively deploy reuse in view of future user opportunities and/or applications.

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                                    6. 29/05/2016
                                      Call for Papers OASE 98 | Narrating Urban Landscapes

                                      The aim of this issue of OASE is to understand the historical foundations of the concept of narrativity in reading and designing the (urban) landscape, and to uncover the relevance of narrativity for today’s practice.
                                      Please send your abstract (maximum 500 words) before 15 July 2016 to 
                                      info@oasejournal.nl.

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                                    7. 18/01/2016
                                      Now available: OASE 95. Crossing Boundaries. Transcultural Practices in Architecture and Urbanism

                                      This issue of OASE takes as its point of departure the cross-cultural conditions in which architects, urban designers and landscape architects work. It focuses in particular on architects working in a condition of displacement – in other words in relation to cultures, far away or nearby, that are not their own.

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                                    8. 12/11/2015
                                      Audio recording presentation OASE 94 online on YouTube

                                      The audio recording of the presentation of OASE 94 with Rem Koolhaas in De Kunsthal on 3 September 2015 is now available online on our YouTube channel: https://youtu.be/OMUWyFEI9p8

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                                    9. 17/08/2015
                                      Presentation of OASE 94 with Rem Koolhaas on Thursday 3 September 2015 in The Kunsthal

                                      Editors Christophe Van Gerrewey and Véronique Patteeuw will talk with Rem Koolhaas about the first decade of the Office for Metropolitan Architecture.

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                                    10. 12/08/2015
                                      OASE 94: Parc de la Villette competition 1982 - CORRECTION

                                      Mr. Bernard Tschumi has informed the editors of OASE of a misattribution in the text of George Baird, published in OASE 94 (OMA The First Decade), on the competition for Parc de la Villette in 1982.

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